Theodore J. “Ted” Krellner, 66, of Emporium

Theodore J. “Ted” Krellner, 66, of 797 Old West Creek Road, Emporium died Saturday February 5, 2011. He was born July 27, 1944 in St. Marys, son of the late Joseph and Margaret Cooney Krellner, who survives. On January 25, 1974 in St. Marks Church, Emporium he married Annice Gorman Krellner, who survives.

Surviving in addition to his wife, Annice Kellner of Emporium

Four sons: Todd, Michael, James, and David
Three daughters: Katherine, Kelly, and Margaret
Five sisters: Sandra, Mrs. Frank Metzler
Evelyn, Mrs. Charles “Bud” Krug
Patricia, Mrs. Carl Pfeufer, all of St. Marys,
Susanne, Mrs. William Astley of Omaha, NE, and Paula, Mrs. Dan Micale of Kersey
Two brothers: Justin of Coudersport and Brian of DuBois.

He was preceded in death by his father Joseph Krellner in 1986 and a sister Kathy Krellner Wilson in 2003.

A graduate of Penn State University with a BS/MS in electrical engineering and the University of Pittsburgh with an MBA in Business. He was employed at GE Sensing as Chief Engineer of the entire GE Sensing Global operation, having traveled to India, China, Great Britain and Korea. He is the inventor of three awarded US Patents: In Feb, of 1998 a “Temperature Sensor Probe” (An improved apparatus for measuring emperature in a location remote from the observer); in Sept. of 2009 an “Infrared Sensor Calibration System & Method” (provides a new sensor calibration technique and system immune to temperature variations); in Sept.of 2009 a “Sensor System & Method” (capable of continuous gathering of pertinent data , e.g. the level of oxygen present in a gaseous environment, while still maintaining accuracy), currently being used in surveillance and medical alarms. Two additional patents have been applied for. He also holds two Korean patents.

He is the author of many White Papers and thermistor articles published in major electronics magazines, He has written numerous procedural manuals and computer programs for use within the company. One withstanding the test of time was a computer program (1985) that links temperature and resistance from a number of parameters that is still used daily by engineers throughout the GE infrastructure. He presented “SMT Power Thermistors” at the Surface Mount International Conference in San Jose, CA in August 1998.

He was a former member of the Board of Directors at Keystone Carbon Co., & former CEO of Keystone Thermometrics, he served on the UL 1434 Committee that regulates thermistor standards, was past chairman of the EIA (Electronic Industries Association) and the local IEEE chapter, and was a registered professional engineer and licensed land surveyor and member of the PA Society of Land Surveyors. He was past chairman of the Cameron Co. Planning Commission, and past president of ELCAM (sheltered workshop).

Ted loved his work and was very dedicated to it. He continued working throughout the duration of his illness. His most recent new product, a “Diesel Particulate Sensor,” was launched in Dec. 2010, and will be used industry-wide in heavy equipment and diesel trucks , functioning as a detector and cleaner of debris in the smoke stacks of diesel engines. He had a vast knowledge of thermistors, from having mastered the intricacies of their design (sometimes testing the products in his own personal vehicle) to their manufacture and discovering useful applications for these temperature sensing devices, including medical, automotive and appliance. He had many major accomplishments throughout his career, a small sampling of which were designing, validating, testing and putting into production a thermistor/terminal assembly that could be directly inserted molded over, eliminating the need for a separate thermistor and lead assembly; and early development of all-plastic sensors to replace the older, more expensive AC sensors. His co-workers joked that “there was no time for celebration-no matter how big the success. Ted would just put the finished project in the bottom drawer of his desk and go straight to the next project,”

On a personal level, Ted had a kind-hearted and amiable personality, and although he had a highly scientific mind, he often displayed an understated quick wit and could spot the humor in many situations.

There will be no visitation. A Memorial Mass of Christian Burial will be held on Tuesday (February 8, 2011) at 10:30 AM at St. Mark Catholic Church in Emporium. Arrangements are under the direction of Barnett Funeral Home, Inc.

Online Condolences may be placed at www.BarnettFuneralHome.net


Save pagePDF pageEmail pagePrint page

One Comment

  1. Frank Cooper says:

    Ted was a talented and dedicated engineer and colleague. We worked together in the days before GE acquired Thermometrics. I enjoyed his wit, and his love of the whiteboard discussions of circuits and alike. His passing marks the loss of a great mind, and fun guy as we traveled at times for business. Being a pilot, he would meet me as I landed at St Mary’s airport as I would arrive for meetings on several ocassions. He was reserve by nature, but had a great wit. Rest in piece my friend.

    Sincerely, Frank Cooper

Leave a Comment